7. KLASICA Webinar held by John Robinson on Nov 06 at 15:00 CEST “Problematizing Behaviour Change”

Conventional approaches to encouraging sustainability-oriented behaviour change focus on individual conscious choice, and are often based on a an information-deficit model that assumes that providing better information on the unsustainable consequences of behaviour will cause behaviour change. Decades of research in multiple fields has shown that this approach is not effective. Using some results from analysis of behaviour in the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability in Vancouver, this talk suggest that a social practice approach, recognizing the prevalence of unconscious and collective processes, may offer a more fruitful approach. I call this approach normalizing sustainability.

Registration URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2940600254107471617
Webinar ID: 576-156-163

John Robinson is a Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs, and the School of the Environment, at the University of Toronto; an Honorary Professor with the Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability at The University of British Columbia; and an Adjunct Professor with the Copenhagen Business School. At the University of Toronto, he is also Presidential Advisor on the Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability. Prof. Robinson’s research focuses on the intersection of climate change mitigation, adaptation and sustainability; the use of visualization, modeling, and citizen engagement to explore sustainable futures; sustainable buildings and urban design; the role of the university in contributing to sustainability; creating partnerships for sustainability with non-academic partners; and, generally, the intersection of sustainability, social and technological change, behaviour change, and community engagement processes.

 

Leuphana-KLASICA Workshop of the Knowledge, Learning, and Societal Change Alliance held on 15 Sep 2017 in Lueneburg, Germany

Fostering Collective Behaviour Change Toward Sustainable Futures:
Models, Narratives and Experiments

Humanity faces tremendous challenges and systemic risks, including climate change, resource limitations, and food insecurity. The well-being and perhaps survival of human society depends upon transforming society to just and equitable sustainable futures, particularly in local contexts. A key issue for this transformation is the question of how collective behaviour change toward sustainable futures occurs or can be fostered in diverse communities at different temporal and spatial scales. Addressing this question is at the core of the international research and action alliance KLASICA (www.klasica.org). KLASICA has sought to identify underlying principles of collective behavior change (CBC) to sustainable futures by examining multiple cases in diverse contexts regarding the pre-conditions, success factors, and barriers in these cases (see link below). Read more … Leuphana-KLASICA Workshop of the Knowledge, Learning, and Societal Change Alliance held on 15 Sep 2017 in Lueneburg, Germany

Next Webinar on Oct 10 held by Dr. Jennifer Helgeson: Institutional Support for Combining Multiple Knowledge Systems in Planning and Policy-making for Community Response and Resilience to Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards

A given community may be considered as a system of systems (i.e., socio-economic networks and supporting physical infrastructure); if there is failure in one part, it is likely that the entire system will be disrupted. Planning and preparations for and response to natural, human-made and technological hazards often competes with other community priorities. Resilience planning challenges actors relevant to the decision-making process across knowledge systems relevant to the community which span the technical/scientific (e.g., transport networks, utilities), faith-based, NGO, local government, and media, among other sectors. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a six-step process that provides a practical and flexible approach to help community actors to jointly set priorities and allocate resources to manage risks facing the community. This process helps communities think through and plan for their social and economic needs, their hazard risks, and recovery of the built environment by encouraging co-production of knowledge and solutions throughout the resilience planning.

This presentation overviews that 6-step process and illustrates the first three steps using a case study example in Colorado, USA. The NIST “Economic Decision Guide for Infrastructure Systems” (EDG) is also introduced, as its seven-step process helps the collaborative resilience planning team in a community decide among possible resilience planning alternatives, including market and non-market values. It also introduces the importance of including the co-benefits that accrue to the community as a product of planning for resilience, even when a disaster has not yet occurred.

Join us for a webinar on Oct 10, 2017 at 3:00 PM CEST.
Register now here https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2446301606154826753

Dr. Jennifer F. Helgeson is an economist in the Applied Economics Office of the Engineering Laboratory (EL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). She currently leads the office’s work on the “Economics of Community Resilience Planning.”

Read more … Next Webinar on Oct 10 held by Dr. Jennifer Helgeson: Institutional Support for Combining Multiple Knowledge Systems in Planning and Policy-making for Community Response and Resilience to Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards